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>> was the president right to kick out the u.s. drug enforcement commission. you are watching "inside story." captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> as a former farmer himself, abel morales can to power in libya promising to help produce cocoa. he kicked at the u.s. drug enforcement administration and begin the country's own system regulating cocoa leaf production. it is an awesome and controversial partnership. it brought heavy criticism from washington. it left to the u.s. government to conclude that bolivia was failing to meet its commitment to fight production of cocaine. a new report suggests the country's on orthodox measures -- unorthodox measures are working. katherine is from the information network. she is one of the members of the -- office of the report. >> the u.s. policy position had a great deal of frustration on the part of oblivion's throughout the country that all u.s. funding was ties to forced eradication -- on the part of bolivians cure of the country that all u.s. funding was tied to forced eradication. it was seen as somethi
knows you and wants you to join her. and how they use the network is the use of the connect feature to send messages. her daughter can send messages to everybody in the network letting them know how she is doing. they used to the calendar to schedule appointments and organize rides. they use the shared tasks and goals to organize larger events. for example, when joe was released from the hospital, she was unable to get back into her home because she could not get up the stairs anymore. they used the network to build her a ramp on saturday afternoon. they use files to share information about her and a place where she keeps her personal information. she has advanced directives, medical records, and so on that is not accessible to everybody in the network, but some of the members. there are stories and photos, a place where people can celebrate today, how to share memories, have the good times that were the essence in the past and in the present. you might be asking yourself this question, if you are a facebook user, how is different from facebook. it is what we called open social netw
would like to call up two of our committee members on stage if you could all join us please, and if you could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community in
anniversary of the september 11 attacks. talks about u.s. efforts to fight terrorist financing. [applause] >> thank you for those kind words and thank you for inviting me to this distinguished meeting here today, which i am honored and privileged to be a part of. i know my boss called david away. i think his role and value in the counter-terrorism effort in the government are evident to all of those who work with him. i want to thank the office of terrorism and counterinsurgency to stop -- you are on the front lines of the fight for national security and our nation is much safer because of your service. i want to thank secretary tim geithner for hosting in sponsoring this today. it is pleasing to see so many friends and colleagues. i see the color is back in his cheeks and he looks much younger. his clothes are a step up from what he had in government work. it does show there is life after government service. good to see you again. in three days, we will mark the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. we have to take a look at the hard work we have done to disrupt the finances of terrorist netw
money. so i used money that i raised with a group of nixon alumns to pay for a lot of this. and i used some of the trust fund money. it is very expensive to do this project, but my goal was to show that the federal government could do this. because most of the times these oral histories are done by private foundations, and they have a vested interest, i would say, in a certain legacy. i am deeply honored in my invitation to this prestigious parliament, and i would like to i see in this a friendship which has been forged through history, and we cannot be indifferent as we confront the financial crisis which threatens you and also affects us. i remain convinced that a united europe, one which is ever stronger, will find the appropriate solutions in order to restore its economy to help. no recession is forever, and the time that a crisis lasts will depend on the progress of the government measures. from mario draghi to christine lagarde, you have available to use some of the best names on the planet, which will help you to overcome crisis. however, my presence here today is an opport
a bound to close guantanamo, president obama signs the national defense authorization act barring use of federal funds to transfer guantanamo prisoners to u.s. soil. 166 prisoners remain in guantanamo, which opened 11 years ago this week. 86 of them have been cleared for release. today we look at the case of one man, al jazeera's sami al-hajj, the only journalist held at guantanamo. held by the u.s. military for more than six years without charge, sami al-hajj was reportedly tortured repeatedly tortured, attack by dogs, hung from the ceiling. in january 2007, he began a hunger strike that lasted 438 days until his release. >> i go on hunger strike for many reasons. we are held in guantanamo without charge, without cause. they did not give us a chance to go to court about our case. >> today, a "democracy now!" exclusive, an extended broadcast interview with sami al-hajj from the headquarters of al jazeera in doha. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. a u.s. drone attack has killed eight people in the paki
. >> anything you might want to add to that? >> yes, they're called a clean circuit. you use the m.c. cable or 12-three, 12-2, the whole circuit. the computer or the microwave. >> so if you can probably do it, it sounds like putting in some kind of metal conduit-clad cable or something that will really reduce the interference. read for me what all these little things mean here. let's tip it up a little bit. >> priority a.w.g. 6-3 type s.o.o. w 600 volt sunlight and water resistant. >> which means what? >> it means it's a cord rather than a cable or wire. the cord is not to be used for permanent wiring. this is a cord that is designed for temporary power. >> it's a big cord. >> it is, it's 50 amp. >> what do they mean when they say primary? >> i don't know what it means. american wire gauge, the six is the size of the aware, the 3 is the three conductors, the type s.o.o.w., that's extra hard use cord. the w stand for wet. 600 volts is the volts it's good for and in the sun and underwater. it's 90 degrees centigrade-rated. it can run as high as 180 degrees without deterioration. this can get
run right down the list of tremendous advantages we have in life and things that bless us so often. it's not something one person did. it's what people do together. and we need each other. all of us need friends. all of us need people to help us do whatever god has called us to do. and listen, when you have friends like that, treasure them. and remember this. the longer you live, the more important your friends become, and here's the reason why. you have less and less time to develop new friends. and that may not sound important to you. when you get my age you'll realize how very important your friends are, and you take care of them. every single one of us needs devoted friends. and we need to be a devoted friend. and if jesus is my guide, i can rest assured of this. he's going to help me choose my friends. he's going to help me choose people to do what i need them to help me do. and the same thing is true in your life. you see, one of the reasons people get out of the will of god is they make wrong choices in relationships. a relationship can catapult you to something good or absolute
is the notion that a lot of what goes on under the hood of the web is not conditioned by us, it's created as a result of a whole lot of activities by marketers that we don't even see or know about. and relating to a transformation in advertising that almost anyone except people in the advertising industry doesn't know about. >> host: what does that mean? >> guest: in the last 20 years, advertising has changed drastically with the rise of cable and then the internet. originally, advertising was making an ad, a commercial and then putting on just a few very popular media; newspapers, radio, magazines. with the rise of cable, all of a sudden you had hundreds of channels, and then with the internet it's infinite. but more so you have tingal stuff, and it -- digital stuff, and it becomes interactive. part of of what we know about is that we can talk back to the advertiser, we can click on manager, there's a -- something, there's a whole lot of stuff going on under the hood where data are taken from us, are used, and we become creatures that are created by the advertisers to understand us and t
there and spend time with these folks day in and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lesson
>> the u.s. president allows the government to continue spying on americans and others without a warrant. you are watching "inside story america" from washington. >> hello. the u.s. capitol is preparing for the inauguration of barack obama. it was before his inauguration four years ago that civil liberties groups had high hopes that president obama would do away with laws put in place by his predecessor that violate u.s. constitutional rights in the name of national security. on sunday, they were disappointed when president obama rhee authorized the foreign intelligence surveillance act 00 re- -- re- authorized the foreign intelligence surveillance act. last week, three u.s. senators tried to amend the legislation to put into protection protections for americans. republicans and democrats came together to reject the proposal in favor of u.s. national security of our constitutional rights. back in our washington, d.c. studios, we are joined by a national security analyst. we also have a legislative counsel for the american civil liberties union and the executive director of the
president wood and planning staff prevent two applications one in condition of use and the second one is a variance application which will be heard by the the zoning administrator. and 18 street we propose the following first, the removal of the existing garage and off street parking on the ground floor and expansion of the ground floor with the roof-deck below. second, t second, t second, t second, t second, the . number 3 the county u county club defined as other institutions large and on the second floor. and then the last parts of the work subject to condition use dhorgs o authorization is the use of the second floor rear roof-deck at the country club out door area. and beside this proposal we're subject to continually use there's a rear yard varngs which is to replace an existing third floor stairway with a spiral stairway. mraen code section 134 requires a subject property to have a rear deck. and to within 5 feet of the property rear line. and pursuant of the planning code construction of a non-compliant structure is prohibited. the stairway is in the rear yard therefore it's r
to meet with us wednesday night. the family got together and that's when she told us that it was legionella bacteria that was the infection. >> reporter: william nicklas fought for his life for three days. the day after thanksgiving he was dead. you thought you would be bringing him home. >> oh, yes, yes. >> reporter: what the family didn't know when nicklas checked in was that the pittsburgh v.a. had been battling an outbreak of legionnaire's disease. there were at least four infections before nicklas. we found that the bacteria was reported in the hospital's water nearly a year before nicklas' death. the manufacturer of the hospital's legionella prevention equipment told us that in december, 2011, the pittsburgh v.a. told them it had a legionella problem. in this e-mail, the company wrote "they have legionella." after an inspection, liquitech concluded the hospital systems were not being properly maintained. >> if they knew there was an outbreak with that hospital you've got two other world renown hospitals located directly across the street from the veterans hospit
inaugural address, the u.s. drone strike kills three people in yemen. today we look at the new documentary, "dirty wars: the world is a battlefield." >> dimon's sue was nothing like kabul. life is defined by the war. everything revolves around it. in yemen, there was no war, of these not officially. >> the film, "dirty wars," follows jeremy scahill to afghanistan, somalia, and yemen as he chases down the hidden truth behind america's expanding covert wars. we will speak with jeremy and the film's director, rick rowley. >> night rates have risen to astronomical levels where there are 1000 raids a month happening. decades after vietnam, one decade into this war, we have gone back to body counts is our only way of measuring any kind of progress in the war. >> broadcasting from the sundance film festival in park city, utah, all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. hundreds of thousands packed into the national mall on monday for president obama's second term inauguration. in an address many saw as a blueprint for a m
. more from foxborough. foxxorough. alecia sent us this photo.. of the post-game celebration.it's titled "me and mmmmy... we won the gamm!" can upload photos nd videos - to us through purpll -at -fox bbltimore -dot- com.and you can see those pictures on ur "see it shoott t send it" page at oxbaltimore dot com.or you can go tooour facebook page.. facebook dot com slash foxbaltimore....click on "inside fox45." some scary moments after sunday's big n-ffc nta championship ame. called to the scene n front of the georgia dome..... after a falcon fans was cut in the throat during an argument with sure if the peooleeinnolved is 3 pcttally atttnded the game. coming up on the early drug addiction. addiction."eventuaaly it becomes very much like a pellpsiig chrooic disease." disease."how the president is planning to ight back... during his second teem. ,3 ((break 1)) ((bump in)) p(ad lib meteorologist)) 3 ((traffic reporter ad libs))map greenspring libertyybat natl pikeshawan395 map 3 coming up... the celebrations are well underway. underwwy.the ravens talk about about etting back to the s
stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd. thanks for letting us come in here. really appreciate it. you're an electrical contractor, too. right? >> i'm electrical for 26 years. we do lots of big projects. we dot lots of industrial and commercial and residential. >> so you have to get a california special license. you have to be a special licensee to do electrical what is that license? >> yes. i have a c-10 licen and b license. >> b is a general contractor's license. >> yes. more interesting for me, i do a lot of c-10 for electrical. >> about three, four years ago you opened up a supply house. >> we opened e & e electric for around five years. >> you don't have so many guys out on the field any more. >> no more. i just have a lot of contractors. they come in for a lot of questions about national code. so if i understand, i tell them whatever i know. my kno
. there are bodies all over the place. they used to bury people in north beach. they would go up there and very bodies. >> there were removed from many of these cemeteries. there is a slogan that is -- anybody know? "it is great to be alive." >> beats the alternative. >> i was wondering if gary boulevard had always been a major thoroughfare. >> it used to have streetcars on it. they are thinking of bringing them back. the b line and the a line where there until the mid-1950's. we are taking the street cars away, but bart will come out here and everything will be fine. >> downtown, gary ave. >> when you get past it, it becomes gary boulevard. >> they wanted streets to be large, they should have vegetation and trees, they should be ornamental. gary strieker was the main road from the 1850's. -- gary street was the main road from the 18th of the's. >> it was planned as a major thoroughfare. >> it was a toll road originally. we make people pay to get on the road and we make them pay when they get to the clubhouse. it was a toll road. >> i think that does it for today. thank you for coming and shari
is not conditioned by us. it's created as a result of a whole lot of activities by marketers we don't even see or know about, and we have a extrapolation in advertisings that almost anyone, except people in the advertising industry-doesn't know about. >> host: what does that mean? the last 20 years advertising has changed drastically with the rise of cable and then the internet. originally advertising was making an ad, a commercial, and then putting it on just a few very popular media, newspapers, television, radio, magazines. with the rise of cable, all of a sudden you had hundreds of channels, and then with the internet, it's incident. and you have digital stuff and it becomes interactive, and apart from what we know about, which is that we can talk back to the advertisers and click on something, there's a whole lot of stuff going on under the hood where data are taken from us, are used and we become creatures that are created by the advertising to understand us and then change what we see on the web very often -- going to happen more and more -- based pop what they think they know about it.
, the american dream,the opportunity to become whatever in mankind or womenkind allows us to be. this is the promise of america. let's act upon team meeting that everyone is included. upon the meaning that everyone is included. it may be inherent dignity and in alienable rights of every warming, a man, boy, and girl be honored. make all your people, especially -- and may all your people, especially the least of these flourished in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington we celebrate the. spiritof our ancestors. it is a nation of on bormann hopes and a history of this enfranchised folks to the union. -- to the expression of a more perfect union. we ask that where our past was riddled by pangs of despair and depression, we ask for your guidance toward the light of delivery and that the vision of -- of deliverance and that the vision of those who came before us and in dreamed of this day, that we recognize their vision still inspire us. they are unseen by the naked eye. all around us, thankful that they are living
, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. the orderly transfer of authority as called for in the constitution routinely takes place, as it has for almost two centuries, and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. in the eyes of many in the world, this every-4-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle. mr. president, i want our fellow citizens to know how much you did to carry on this tradition. by your gracious cooperation in the transition process, you have shown a watching world that we are a united people pledged to maintaining a political system which guarantees individual liberty to a greater degree than any other, and i thank you and your people for all your help in maintaining the continuity which is the bulwark of our republic. the business of our nation goes forward. these united states are confronted with an economic affliction of great proportions. we suffer from the lo
that temporarily incompass taits that is false. when use as intended they cause pain and as we have seen across the nation they pose a risk of serious jury or death. >> as you have heard today, in particular people with mental health problem are more likely to be at high risk of death, and with that high population in san francisco and coming in contact often with the san francisco police department, we don't want to run a risk of that population being impacted. and the aclu is also concerned with the civil rights implications that the supervisors spoke of today. you know, across the nation and in san francisco, you will see the african american communities of color are impacted by accessive use of force that would lead us to believe that once they are instituted they would also be disproportionately used against the xhupts of color. because they are easy to use it will increase over use and officers will be use it as the first line rather than reverting to what they used in training such as verbal commands and we also have outlined many incidents of litigation that have occurred... >> just som
>> i'm alyssa milano, and i'm gonna let you in on a little secret. i don't use shampoo anymore. that's right. i don't use it at all. so why does my hair look this healthy and shiny? because now i use wen. i mean, look at this hair. my hair is softer, shinier, and the volume? who doesn't want more volume? ordinary shampoo? you don't need that anymore. all you need is wen. >> what does it take to get your hair this beautiful? just one thing: the wen healthy hair care system by chaz dean. it's revolutionary hair care that takes the place of shampoo, conditioner, deep conditioner, de-tangler, and leave-in conditioner all in one, saving you time working on your hair, and saving you money on all the products you won't need anymore. most ordinary shampoos that lather use sulfates and detergents that may strip your hair of natural oils and cause dryness, frizziness, dullness, and color fade, but wen is designed to gently cleanse and moisturize your hair and scalp with no harsh stripping agents, making hair shinier, softer, stronger, fuller after just one use. n cleansing conditioners h
using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the sc
design using concrete rather than the scheme that was potentially planned for previous to that, which was a steel frame structure that used hydraulic dampers to control seismic motion. >> so, i met with my team. we worked hard. we came up with a great idea. let's take out the heavy steel structure, let's put in an innovative vertical post tension concrete structure, great idea. we did that. a lot of other things. and we came up with a price of 140 million. so, we achieved that goal. and, so, when we first started looking at the building, it was going to cost a lot of money. because of the way it was being built, we could only get 12 floors. we wanted more space for our employees. we ended up going and saying, okay, if we do a concrete building instead, which was web core's idea, we can get 13 floors, not 12 floors. the concrete doesn't require much space between the floors as a steel building does. and it could be cheaper. yes, more space, less money, great idea. ♪ ♪ >> we know that right now there are things happening in power, with sewer, with water that are not always proven te
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids refle
of the human touch and that is what the discussion is about today. is leading us down that path, and giving this pilot project, this different approach a chance to work. rather than jumping to the immediate conclusion that it will not work unless officers have another potential weapon on their belt. that is not something that the community is calling for. and hospitality house, every day, we are dealing with people. in various stages of crisis, i would submit that this room is full of people at different points of the mental health continuum. depending on the out come of an election, the supervisors can find them... >> we are asking the police department. >> not this one. >> thank you, mr. wilson, next speaker please. >> good afternoon, i am a san francisco resident and volunteer at the coalition. and i am here to say that the taser is not going to work because there are a lot of people that are going to hurt them and you know like me, in the case and i have a condition of health and one of those hit me, you know, i don't know how it is going to work on me. so i have a chance to say, it is
distance between us: a memoir." she shares her experiences growing up in mexico without her parents who immigrated to the united states legally -- illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. now >> joining us now is reyna grande who was the author of a memoir, "the distance between us" is what it's called. what is reyna grande, where did you grow up? >> where did i grow up. up, i was born in a small city in mexico.'s three nobody has really heard of it. it's about three hours away from acapulco. dri it's in land and if you're driving from mexico city to acapulco, you have to pass by it >>ent how big isn't? >> it was very small when i was growing up. pe there it has about over 100,000 people there but i grew up in they. outskirts of the city. so to me it felt more like auray small town. rt it was very rural. you know, there were dirt roads, no running water. tha the city was very unstable. so that's where i grew up, in the the outskirts very, very close to the mountains. which are very, very beautiful, and, you know, very meaningful to me because when my parents came to the u.s.,
us? >> i've been reading through the stam and they feel there's been a pause in the u.s. economy and they're not yet confidence about the job situation. they want to see a lower unemployment rate. they will continue their current ease to support the economy. the u.s. federal reserve made the decision at a two-day meeting of it federal open market committee that ended wednesday. the policymakers said in a statement that growth and economic activity had paused in recent months. this was despite improvements in the housing market, personal spending and business the deraserve attributed the slow down to a high jobless rate and the effects of hurricane sandy which hit the u.s. east coast last year. the fed said it will continue buying mortgage backed securities and treasury bonds worth $85 billion a month. the key interest rate will be kept at virtually zero as long as the unemployment rate stays above 6.5%. the u.s. jobless rate stood at 7.8% in december. the u.s. economy shrank in the first months. officials at the u.s. commerce department released on wednesday the preliminary gross
nothing other an assassination and should not be used in this context, especially prolong whos family requested that the case nod not to be exploited for this. >> two, as regards commander ali assertion that a person under the influence of drugs or experiencing mental health episodes would have a greater pain tolerance, the documented science regarding that point is inconclusive what is ininclusive is the severe threat to their vital health that is posed by tasing such an individual. >> three, in portland just a few weeks ago, a settlement was reached after a september department of justice decision against the portland police for the misuse of tasers, specifically against people with mental elth issues. the plea bargain will cost 5.4 million annually including cit and including housing and treatment. and including 180 day deadline for internal affairs and a limit for complaints against the police must be heard. >> number 4 is that the lawsuits will happen. the draft policy i have read over the police draft policy multiple times and they do not cover the recent ninth circuit decisions
preparations and its military movement based on its defense position. >> the u.s. special representative on north korea policy called on p'yongyang not to carry out a nuclear test. >> it would be highly provocative, it would set back the cause of trying to find a solution to these longstanding problems that have prevented the peninsula from becoming reunited. i think it's important that they do not test. >> davies also used his visit -- the policy that the nuclear test would make harder to fulfil in her first month in office. in the past, north korea has tied such actions around important dates. it is worth noting that the inauguration and the birthday of kim jong il fall in february. harry fawcett, p'yongyang, south korea. >> hong lee has responded to north korea's announcement. >> maintaining peace and stability on the korean peninsula and effecting denuclearization is in the joint interest of all sides. the present situation on the korean peninsula is very complex and sensitive. we hope the relevant parties can remain calm and speak in a cautious and prudent way and not take any steps
.14 on thursday on the new york foreign exchange. the dollar got a boost from strong u.s. housing starts and jobs data. policy makers will meet next tuesday. >> we think the trend on the yen will continue throughout this year. our six month focus for a yen of 90 was just reached. it's likely to rise farther. the key factor in the first half of the year is japan's stanceo pursue aggressive market and fiscal policy. the governments is very likely to keep pressuring on the boj. nominations for boj governor is likely that candidates are appointed. the risk is the debt ceiling negotiation in the u.s. during february. we think that u.s. congres will not reach an agreement to derail the u.s. economic recovery. it should be temporary and limited. >> the yen is weaker against the euro. that's on similar expectations for more monetary easing pressures from the bank of japan. the euro quoted at 120.4 to 1. the euro has gained ground against the yen and the dollar. analysts say that's due to worries over with the euro zone. let's see how this is affecting tokyo stocks. share prices surging across the board.
the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around world. ricardo cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry and slinger to keep the coca-cola co. supplied with cocoa while trying to ban its use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book "a secret history of coffee, coca and cola", a tale of coffee, coca-cola, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and the future of prohibition. ricardo cortes is creator and illustrator of subversive books for all ages but mostly all ages about such things as marijuana and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much profit, how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring they come into this country and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. san ho tree and, though -- ca e carletta anhgo. i want to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming
that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with our tenants. it's an honor to have you guys here. enjoy the day and it's an honor to welcome jane back to the hatchery. (applause) >> good morning, my nam
have bon become cleaner. they have become easier for us to use and the process has become a lot more efficient. >> school. -- cool. i was told if you have a question you should line up at that microphone right there. if you're coming up -- no, he did youant [speaker not understood]. >> i don't have a question. i wanted to comment on this. i think something else is really unique and maybe one of the untold stories or not told so much stories about the impact of open data is really the companies that are being formed. and as you mentioned earlier, they're a sustainable company and this is being powered by open data and motion loft is figuring out how they can share the asset that sort of your business model is built on. so, i think that this is presenting a whole new type of question for sort of apps built with government data or public data. >> i guess i'll jump in once here, too, while people are stepping up. we've been doing this for awhile now. one thing we've learned in this innovation space, people matter. like you can build technology you want, platform you want, that's gre
torrez to join us again on stage, joaquin will be introducing the mayor and if i can ask my fellow committee members to also join us on stage. joaquin. >> thank you very much i have to say as director the mayor's oches of neighborhood services it's refreshing to have a mayor so dedicated to couldn't and it makes my job easier when our people in the community want to feel our elected efficients make our needs and it's in physical presence and i have had the great pleasure of serving under our mayor lee who i would like to make a invite to make a few remarks in honor or of arab heritage month here in san francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now
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